AppFutura

Google promotes progressive web apps now

Google continuously proves that it not only has the ability to go toe-to-toe with the best in the industry, but that it never stops pushing the boundaries of what is possible. The last couple of years we have seen consumers gravitate towards the mobile experience. To cope with this Google has been planning and testing out ways to blur those lines. But, with their latest rollout, Google has finally pulled the trigger and introduced a way to seamlessly merge the web and the mobile experience.

progressive web apps by Google

The feature is known as Progressive Web Apps, and as the name suggests it is supposed to take the web app experience to a whole new level for users and mobile app development companies. Web apps have been around for a while now, but they were second class citizens, at best, on most devices. When created, web apps were relegated to the home screen, appearing as just another icon. However, with this update Google allows web apps to take their rightful place with other full applications. For mobile app developers, this means that web apps also live in the app drawer and have the same notification controls. This level of integration has previously been unheard of.
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Google Cast SDK open for developers

The fall of 2016 heralded a new age for one of Google’s more famous products, Google Cast, or as it is now officially known as Chromecast built-in. The name may be less catchy and more of a mouthful, but it more accurately represents what is really going on. So adamant is Google with the name change that it has thrown the old term out to the wolves and has already began phasing it out from existence. Even third party companies and device makers have already started using the new nomenclature.

Google Cast

Chromecast has been around for several years now and users have been able to use the technology to create a bridge between their devices and a larger display such as an LCD TV or monitor. According to Google, the name change solidifies the identity and purpose in the users mind, by helping them identify the devices and technology that they can use on Chromecast.
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Android N developers preview

ANDROID MWC

Android N is the new version of Android OS for smartphones and tablets. As usual, everyone is trying to figure out the full name. It seems that the most popular option at the moment is Android 7.0 Nutella (or will it be Nougat?), but you can take any dessert name and start your bet.

Google released the first Android N developer preview for Nexus 6P, Nexus 5X, Nexus 6, Nexus 9 (Wi-Fi and LTE), Nexus Player and Pixel C on the Android Developers site on March 9, two months earlier than expected (that is, before the annual Google IO conference which always takes place in May). It seems that Google won’t introduce Android N during the Google IO event in May 18-20 for mobile app developers.
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Top app development companies video interview: Bruce Lawson from Opera Software

opera software vi

Bruce Lawson, Web Evangelyst at Opera Software, is our special guest in this mobile app development video interview series. Bruce Lawson started working in technology, mobile and web industry accidentally. The Web Evangelyst has written a well known book for all our mobile app development companies: Introducing HTML5 by Bruce Lawson and Remy Sharp. He also wrote a book about how to make websites accessible for people with disabilities and lots of articles about Opera, mobiles, devices, CSS, Javascript, HTML 5…
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AppFutura

Chrome OS: overview, applications and developing possibilities

Chrome OS: overview, applications and  developing possibilities
Chrome OS is an operating system based on the Linux kernel and designed by Google to work with web apps and installed apps. It was announced on July 2009 as an OS with applications and user data stored in the cloud so it could be accessed from any device running that OS. Google’s intention is that you have the same browser for your computer, phone and tablet, and that you can personalize your Chrome browser by installing web apps, themes and extensions.

Google released Chrome OS’s source code as the Chromium OS project in 2009. Developers can so modify the code from Chromium OS and build their own versions, although Chrome OS code is only supported by Google and its partners and only runs on hardware designed for the purpose. Chrome OS is automatically updated to the latest version.

Since 2014, Chrome OS can run Android apps natively, and this month has been launched a beta version of Android apps able to run Chrome OS.

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